Please share your inspiration


#1

I’m having a tough time sifting through online content to find tidbits to add to stuff I play. Perhaps if I post something specific each time I post here it could lead to a source of inspiration.

Yesterday i discovered Songster. It’s kinda like the GP player (Tab Pro) built into ultimateguitar.com , but not so spammy with the cash grab pop-ups. You can use the heck out of it until you want features like loop, or slow tempo. Then you decide whether to pay or not.
https://www.songsterr.com/a/wsa/metal-tabs-t1

Specifically I found inspiration from the Three Days Grace tab for “Never Too Late”. It only took a few minutes to master and I had never learned this song yet before. It was also just a simple drop D downtune.


#2

That one?


#3

Yeah, that seems like a neat feature of Songsterr. there seems to only be 1 version of each song. It’s like they sorted through the gp files and picked the best one for you and loaded it into their player.


#4

How about some Andy timmons?


#5

That’s very nice. My fingers struggled mightily with the unfamiliar diminished chords. Gonna have to find a patch that does this one justice and turn it up tomorrow when nobody is sleeping. thanks


#6

Found a little bit of inspiration today in kind of a roundabout way.

I wanted to find a neat backing track to practice soloing. Since I only know two scales memorized pentatonic and major it would have to be a major or minor track. So the first vid that pops up when you google backing tracks is this little B minor diddy:

So I’m playing along and it’s mentioning B dorian tabs in the text pop-ups. So i google the b dorian scale and to my amazement, it’s got the pentatonic scale built into it.


Also cool is that the line at the bottom of that page that explains what Dorian is. It explains that B dorian is the second position of the A major scale. Sweet, i get to use “both” scales I already know in the jam.

So I figure this is too easy, so why not learn some sweeps while I’m at it? SO i google up this little sweep pattern in A major and work it into the jam.

Sweet, so I move this pattern an octave down and all the sudden I go from simple jamming in pentatonic to soloing all over the neck in 2 different scales and using sweeps that are actually in the right key. mind blown in a matter of 5 minutes.


#7

I usually use a metronome or make a drum track to play along to and something inevitably comes out. Then as soon as something sticks, I record it and expand on it to see where it goes. So I guess an open canvas is my inspiration.
For a different approach, I also am loving the Digitech Trio Plus. Play a couple of ideas into it and then see what it comes up with. Hours of fun!


#8

Wow the Les Robot demo video on that trio plus looks like it would be a blast. How long have you had it? do you find what it comes up with to be kinda repetitive fairly quickly? I see you can adjust the drums even within the genres which I guess would mix it up a little bit.


#9

Sometimes inspiration comes from just from realizing how bad you are…

I google advanced guitar lessons and come up with this link:

Actually turns out to be beginner type stuff unless you apply the advice to take neat licks you know and find new ways to play them, but that sounds a lot like work.

So this guy is making flawless full step bends on this easy lick, I’m not even coming close to hitting a full bend note at the right pitch repeatably. So the challenge starts. I first master this simple lick, then move on to bending scales (i play the the pentatonic scale, but the note is actually the fingering below, but bent up to the next scale tone). This is an incredible challenge to play in key, but loads of fun. Finally i’m even nailing the 3 step bends. But for some reason, I suck at applying vibrato on top of a 2 step or better bent note. Especially on b, or high e string where you pull down instead of push up the string because of fretboard space constraints. I can kinda bend the note up and shake my hand a little, but this gets weird results sometimes. The guy in the video seems to do it pretty easily. Perhaps its just my guitar? gonna have to look into this some more…


#10

You mean the other way around on the B and E strings? You push up not pull right? I would run out of the fretboard if I pulled. I usually push up on G, B and high E and pull down on Low E, A and D.

To practice bend accuracy I slide first to hear the target pitch then I practice the bend until I hit the same target.



#11

I had the Trio for about a month now… It all depends on what you come up with. So far, it hasn’t been repetitive because you can dial a good amount of variations.
The looper is the best that I’ve used! So intuitive and easy to time as opposed to others requiring a new skill set.
My son tried it out and played some arpeggiated stuff. I read that it may get tricky with the Trio but it came up with a really cool solution. As hard as it is to impress a jaded teen, it really got his attention.


#12

Thanks, neat stuff, I realize now that my push is a lot weaker than my pull.


#13

There’s no one-size fits all solution to being inspired. You have to want to play unless your income is dependent on it. Some days, if you’re not itching to pick up your guitar, there’s no reason that you have to. For me, knowing that it’s my choice to do so makes me want to play and not resent it.


#14

Some days I play well, some days not, my good days inspire me, on the not so good ones, I use the glitches I notice on those not great days to relearn some good playing habits. Nowadays I am into pausing and inserting silences between runs, and sustaining the notes a bit more. (not to mention my age has slowed my hands down a bit because of nerve problems.) I can’t actually feel the guitar like I used to for about 15 minutes into my practice. Old age is a real treat…


#15

Silence is musical. I can’t seem to get my band to buy off on that concept. If there’s a space, they feel obligated to fill it, even when I tell them that it’s supposed to be quiet there.